New Books in the Library – March 2015

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America’s Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our broken healthcare system

Barak, Aharon
KMK2097 .B3713 2015


Americas Bitter Pill book coverAmerica’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s much-anticipated, sweeping narrative of how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. Brill probed the depths of our nation’s healthcare crisis in his trailblazing Time magazine Special Report, which won the 2014 National Magazine Award for Public Interest. Now he broadens his lens and delves deeper, pulling no punches and taking no prisoners.

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The Contentious History of the International Bill of Human Rights

Roberts, Christopher N. J.
K3238.31948 .R63 2015


The Contentious History of the International Bill of Human Rights book coverToday, the idea of human rights enjoys near-universal support; yet, there is deep disagreement about what human rights actually are – their true source of origin, how to study them, and how best to address their deficits. In this sweeping historical exploration, Christopher N. J. Roberts traces these contemporary conflicts back to their moments of inception and shows how more than a half century ago, a series of contradictions worked their way into the International Bill of Human Rights, the foundation of the modern system of human rights. By viewing human rights as representations of human relations that emerge from struggle, this book charts a new path into the subject of human rights and offers a novel theory and methodology for rigorous empirical study.

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Guantanamo Diary

Slahi, Mohamedou Ould
HV9468.5.S58 A3 2015


Guantanamo Diary book coverSince 2002, Mohamedou Slahi has been imprisoned at the detention camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In all these years, the United States has never charged him with a crime. A federal judge ordered his release in March 2010, but the U.S. government fought that decision, and there is no sign that the United States plans to let him go.Three years into his captivity Slahi began a diary, recounting his life before he disappeared into U.S. custody, “his endless world tour” of imprisonment and interrogation, and his daily life as a Guantánamo prisoner. His diary is not merely a vivid record of a miscarriage of justice, but a deeply personal memoir—terrifying, darkly humorous, and surprisingly gracious. Published now for the first time, Guantánamo Diary is a document of immense historical importance and a riveting and profoundly revealing read.

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Human Dignity: The Constitutional Value and the Constitutional Right

Barak, Aharon
KMK2097 .B3713 2015


Human Dignity book coverHuman dignity is now a central feature of many modern constitutions and international documents. As a constitutional value, human dignity involves a person’s free will, autonomy, and ability to write a life story within the framework of society. As a constitutional right, it gives full expression to the value of human dignity, subject to the specific demands of constitutional architecture. This analytical study of human dignity as both a constitutional value and a constitutional right adopts a legal-interpretive perspective. It explores the sources of human dignity as a legal concept, its role in constitutional documents, its content, and its scope. The analysis is augmented by examples from comparative legal experience, including chapters devoted to the role of human dignity in American, Canadian, German, South African, and Israeli constitutional law.

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Human Rights and Law Enforcement at Sea: Arrest, Detention and Transfer of Piracy Suspects

Petrig, Anna
KZ7212 .P48 2014


Human Rights and Law Enforcement at Sea book coverLaw enforcement at sea has become an increasingly important tool for combating transnational crime. Such law enforcement operations are commonly directed by multinational missions composed of military rather than police forces, and are often carried out in maritime areas not subject to national jurisdiction. Because of these characteristics, maritime law enforcement operations touch upon many unresolved human rights issues. In the present study, counter-piracy operations off the coast of Somalia and in the Indian Ocean serve as the quintessential example of how law enforcement measures taken at sea may fall short of international human rights standards.

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The Myth of the Cultural Jew: Culture and Law in Jewish Tradition

Kwall, Roberta Rosenthal
BM520.6 .K83 2015


The myth of the cultural Jew book coverA myth exists that Jews can embrace the cultural components of Judaism without appreciating the legal aspects of the Jewish tradition. This myth suggests that law and culture are independent of one another. In reality, however, much of Jewish culture has a basis in Jewish law. Similarly, Jewish law produces Jewish culture. A cultural analysis paradigm provides a useful way of understanding the Jewish tradition as the product of both legal precepts and cultural elements. This paradigm sees law and culture as inextricably intertwined and historically specific. This perspective also emphasizes the human element of law’s composition and the role of existing power dynamics in shaping Jewish law.

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The War on Terror and the Laws of War: A Military Perspective

Corn, Geoffrey S.
KZ6795.T47 C67 2015


The War on Terror and the Laws of War book coverIn The War on Terror and the Laws of War seven legal scholars, each with experience as military officers, focus on how to strike an effective balance between the necessity of using armed violence to subdue a threat to the nation with the humanitarian interest of mitigating the suffering inevitably associated with that use. Each chapter addresses a specific operational issue, including the national right of self-defense, military targeting and the use of drones, detention, interrogation, trial by military commission of captured terrorist operatives, and the impact of battlefield perspectives on counter-terror military operations, while illustrating how the law of armed conflict influences resolution of that issue. This Second Edition carries on the critical mission of continuing the ongoing dialogue about the law from an unabashedly military perspective, bringing practical wisdom to the contentious topic of applying international law to the battlefield.

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Perspectives on Patentable Subject Matter

K1505 .P45 2015


Perspectives on Patentable Subject Matter book coverPerspectives on Patentable Subject Matter brings together leading scholars to offer diverse perspectives on one of the most pressing issues in patent law: the basic question about which types of subject matter are even eligible for patent protection, setting aside the widely known requirement that a claimed invention avoid the prior art and be adequately disclosed. Some leading commentators and policy-making bodies and individuals envision patentable subject matter to include anything under the sun made by humans, whereas other leaders envision a range of restrictions for particular fields of endeavor, from business methods and computer software to matters involving life, such as DNA and methods for screening or treating disease. Employing approaches that are both theoretically rigorous and grounded in the real world, this book is well suited for practicing lawyers, managers, lawmakers, and analysts, as well as academics conducting research or teaching a range of courses in law schools, business schools, public policy schools, and in economics and political science departments, at either the undergraduate or graduate level.

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Reclaiming Accountability: Transparency, Executive Power, and the U.S. Constitution

Kitrosser, Heidi
KF5050 .K58 2015


Reclaiming Accountability book coverAmericans tend to believe in government that is transparent and accountable. Those who govern us work for us, and therefore they must also answer to us. But how do we reconcile calls for greater accountability with the competing need for secrecy, especially in matters of national security? Those two imperatives are usually taken to be antithetical, but Heidi Kitrosser argues convincingly that this is not the case—and that our concern ought to lie not with secrecy, but with the sort of unchecked secrecy that can result from “presidentialism,” or constitutional arguments for broad executive control of information.

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This entry was posted on March 20, 2015 by in Collection and tagged , .

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